Important Safety Information

Indication: ORACEA® (doxycycline, USP) 40 mg* Capsules are indicated for the treatment of only inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules) of rosacea in adult patients. ORACEA Capsules do not lessen the facial redness caused by rosacea. Adverse Events: In controlled clinical studies, the most commonly reported adverse events (>2%) in patients treated with ORACEA Capsules were nasopharyngitis, sinusitis, diarrhea, hypertension and aspartate aminotransferase increase. Warnings/Precautions: ORACEA Capsules should not be used to treat or prevent infections. ORACEA Capsules should not be taken by patients who have a known hypersensitivity to doxycycline or other tetracyclines. ORACEA Capsules should not be taken during pregnancy, by nursing mothers, or during tooth development (up to the age of 8 years). Although photosensitivity was not observed in clinical trials,
ORACEA Capsules patients should minimize or avoid exposure to natural or artificial sunlight. The efficacy of ORACEA Capsules treatment beyond 16 weeks and safety beyond 9 months have not been established

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch
or call 1-800-FDA-1088

*30 mg immediate release and 10 mg delayed release beads

“I remember hiding in the kitchen when my
rosacea appeared, not even wanting to say hello
to my customers”

NOW LOOK AT ME

Not an actual patient
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Male chef with short dark hair and moderate rosacea, standing in the empty restaurant with his arms crossed looking at the camera. Not an actual patient.
Not an actual patient

TAKE CONTROL

What is rosacea?

If you’ve been experiencing facial redness, blushing, or small bumps and blemishes that resemble acne, you could be one of 16 million Americans with rosacea,
a chronic inflammatory skin disease. You know that it not only impacts how you look, but it can affect how you feel as well

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Everyone’s rosacea is unique, and your treatment should be too!

Your best bet to help achieve clearer skin is by working with your dermatologist to get a formal diagnosis and set your treatment goals together

Over-the-counter rosacea treatments may not have given you the results you were looking for in the past, and if left untreated, your rosacea may get worse. The sooner you work with your dermatologist to seek the right treatment, which may include a prescription, the sooner you may achieve clearer skin

Making the switch to an effective prescription treatment that is right for you may improve your symptoms of rosacea. The time to act is now!

Guide the discussion with your dermatologist, and start your journey to help achieve clearer skin today

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Tips and tricks

Tips and tricks

Looking for tips and tricks to help manage your bumps and blemishes of rosacea? 

Effective treatment

Effective treatment

Learn more about an effective rosacea treatment that is safe for long-term use*  

Resources

Resources

Your go-to rosacea resource for up-to-date information, news, and insights

ROSACEA SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

What to look for

Rosacea can show up differently on everyone and may slowly spread beyond the nose and cheeks. Rosacea can be categorized within four subtypes:

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Skin thickening

(PHYMA)

A rarer type of rosacea causes the skin to thicken and develop a bumpy texture. This may happen on the chin, forehead, cheeks and ears, but the nose is most frequently affected

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EYE IRRITATION

(OCULAR ROSACEA)

The eyes may become red and irritated, causing an itchy feeling that burns or stings. This type can even lead to light sensitivity and blurred vision

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BUMPS AND BLEMISHES

(INFLAMMATORY LESIONS)

A common characteristic of rosacea is acne-like breakouts. While these bumps and blemishes might resemble acne, treating them with harsh acne medications may upset sensitive skin (common with rosacea) and make the condition worse

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PERSISTENT FACIAL REDNESS

(ERYTHEMA)

For many, facial redness is the most noticeable symptom. Rosacea can take on a distinctive pattern, affecting the cheeks, nose, chin and forehead near the center of the face


Help identify your rosacea signs and symptoms

Download our factsheet, and talk to a dermatologist about your rosacea

quote

“Better control over the bumps and blemishes of my rosacea helps me feel better when I interact with customers. Now I’m back doing what I love the most”

Male chef with short dark hair and moderate rosacea, looking out of the restaurant door holding the OPEN sign. Not an actual patient.
Not an actual patient
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Living with Rosacea

WHAT OTHERS ARE SAYING

ROSACEA TRIGGERS

What can cause rosacea flares?

Treatment is only one part of your journey. Understanding your triggers is an important aspect of helping to manage the bumps and blemishes of your rosacea for the long term*

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Environment

Sun, strong wind and hot and cold temperatures may trigger your rosacea

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Lifestyle

Stress, anxiety, and strenuous exercise could exacerbate your rosacea

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Medical conditions

These include menopause, chronic cough, caffeine withdrawal syndrome

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Beverages

Alcohol and/or hot drinks may cause your symptoms to worsen

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FOODS

Spicy and hot foods, dairy products, certain beans, fruits, and chocolate may cause your rosacea to flare

ring ring
Make chef with short dark hair and moderate rosacea, talking with a colleague in the kitchen while chopping food. Not an actual patient.
Not an actual patient

KNOW THE DIFFERENCE

Acne or rosacea?

As the bumps and blemishes of rosacea can resemble acne, the two skin conditions are often mistaken for each other. While the symptoms may be similar, knowing what to look for will help you distinguish between the two

Oracea Bottle

STAY CONNECTED

Sign up and
stay up-to-date

Sign up here to receive updates and useful information to help better understand your rosacea

Important Safety Information

Indication: ORACEA® (doxycycline, USP) 40 mg§ Capsules are indicated for the treatment of only inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules) of rosacea in adult patients. ORACEA Capsules do not lessen the facial redness caused by rosacea. Adverse Events: In controlled clinical studies, the most commonly reported adverse events (>2%) in patients treated with ORACEA Capsules were nasopharyngitis, sinusitis, diarrhea, hypertension and aspartate aminotransferase increase. Warnings/Precautions: ORACEA Capsules should not be used to treat or prevent infections. ORACEA Capsules should not be taken by patients who have a known hypersensitivity to doxycycline or other tetracyclines. ORACEA Capsules should not be taken during pregnancy, by nursing mothers, or during tooth development (up to the age of 8 years). Although photosensitivity was not observed in clinical trials, ORACEA Capsules patients should minimize or avoid exposure to natural or artificial sunlight. The efficacy of ORACEA Capsules treatment beyond 16 weeks and safety beyond 9 months have not been established

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088

*Based on safety data from a 9-month clinical trial
Self-administered online survey completed by 710 adult rosacea patients from France, Germany, Italy, UK, Canada and the USA who had been diagnosed by a doctor (declarative), taken a prescribed rosacea treatment in the past 12 months, and visited a doctor at least twice for their rosacea in the past 12 months
Self-administered online survey completed by 361 physicians, 300 rosacea patients and 318 psoriasis patients with facial involvement from France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Canada and the USA. Inclusion criteria for patients: adults suffering from at least a moderate disease impact (DLQI ≥6) with a diagnosis of rosacea or psoriasis on the face, taken at least one prescribed treatment for their disease in the past 12 months, and visited a physician at least once for their disease in the past 12 months
§30 mg immediate release and 10 mg delayed release beads

REFERENCES

1. Rosacea: Beyond the visible report. Available at: https://hosted.bmj.com/rosaceabeyondthevisible. Last accessed: September 2021 2. National Rosacea Society 2020. Rosacea Review. Rosacea now estimated to affect at least 16 million American. Available at: https://www.rosacea.org/rosacea-review/2010/winter/rosacea-now-estimated-to-affect-at-least-16-million-americans. Last accessed: September 2021 3. Blount, RW, & Pelletier, AL. Rosacea: a common yet commonly overlooked condition. American family physician. 2002;66(3), 435. 4. Del Rosso JQ, et al. Two randomized phase Ill clinical trials evaluating anti-inflammatory dose doxycycline (40-mg doxycycline, USP capsules) administered once daily for treatment of rosacea. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007;56(5):791–802. 5. Del Rosso JQ, et al. Comparison of anti-inflammatory dose doxycycline versus doxycycline 100 mg in the treatment of rosacea. J Drugs Dermatol. 2008;7(8):573–576. 6. Pelle, MT, Crawford, GH, & James, WD. Rosacea: II. therapy. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004;51(4), 499-512. 7. National Rosacea Society. (2020). All About Rosacea. Available: https://www.rosacea.org/patients/all-about-rosacea. Last accessed: September 2021 8. Steinhoff M, et al. Beyond the Visible: Rosacea and Psoriasis of the face. The BMJ Hosted Content 2020. Available at: https://hosted.bmj.com/rosaceabeyondthevisible. Last accessed: September 2021 9. National Rosacea Society. (2020). Factors That May Trigger Rosacea Flare-Ups. Available: https://www.rosacea.org/patients/rosacea-triggers/factors-that-may-trigger-rosacea-flare-ups. Last accessed: September 2021 10. Preshaw PM, et al. Modified-release sub-antimicrobial dose doxycycline enhances scaling and root planning in subjects with periodontal disease. J Periodontol. 2008;79(3):440–452